Business Cards In Japan

Presentation Meishi requires presentation at a meeting with a new business partner. It is held in a leather case where they do not become warm or , as this is a sign of disrespect or thoughtlessness. Basic rules exchange of business cards next. The owner keeps business cards meishi both hands on the bottom corners up the party, which indicated a place of employment, position and company name, so that the information can read the user receives. User should take two hands, holding the top two corners.

It's important not to close the fingers on your business card information – it is regarded as rude. After receiving the cards you need to read the name and position and thank you for it, saying, 'choudai-itashimasu' or 'choudaishimasu' and bowing. On the received business card in any case can not be anything to write, as well as putting it in his pocket. Meishi should be carefully placed in the department of leather business card holders. When meishi exchanged by the parties to different social position, the one who is lower on the social ladder, so should submit their business card, so it was slightly below the cards a person with higher status. If the cards were handed across the table that before the end of the conversation she must be on business card holders.

If present at a meeting a few people and you presented some meishi, a business card that someone has a higher status to be stored on the card holders, the rest – next to you on the table. How the recipient handles received meishi, indicates that the recipient will be doing business with those from whom he received this business card. Careless actions such as folding the cards in half and stuffed into the back pocket pants will be regarded as an insult. More info: Cyrus Massoumi. Appearance Unlike some Western business cards Japanese business cards meishi emphasis is placed on the company. For example, meishi will contain the company name printed in large letters, and then only the position and name. Also presented the Japanese themselves: first, company and position, and then name. Usually the person's name written in Japanese using kanji and romaji (usually the characters on the front side cards, and romaji on the back) as well as the position of the individual and the company where he works. Another important information that may indicate the meishi – it is a legal address, telephone number and fax number. Meishi may also contain a two-dimensional barcode, which is the contact information in 'machine readable' form, but it has not yet become common practice. According to a survey in 2007, less than 3% of Japanese own meishi with two-dimensional bar code. Traditionally, the size meishi made from old-Japanese paper, a special format, called yong, although meishi size of 90 55 mm, is also gaining popularity. Women's Japanese business cards once were smaller than men, have rounded edges and called sang, but they are now virtually obsolete.

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