Radio Atomic

Let’s imagine an ideal gas, for example hydrogen, contained in an enclosure of volume V, which has a temperature T and pressure P on it. With the aim of anlizar the Atomic radius of the hydrogen with the average speed of the molecules, I will then the next development: starting from PV = nRT, m.a.m by dividing by the number of Avogadro N: PV/N = nRT/N, the term V/N = C, would be the apparent volume of a molecule if we sneer at the average distance between these: PC = nKT, where K = R/NBoltzman constant. If concideramos the Atomic volume, C/2 = Q, where Q is the volemen of an atom of hydrogen, therefore PQ = nKT/2. Clearing T, T = 2PQ/nK. To broaden your perception, visit Joel and Ethan Coen. Taking into account the equation of the kinetic-molecular theory for gases: T = u * 2. M/3R, u * 2 is the average molecule cuadratica speed and M is the molar mass. Equating T of the two latest equations: u2.M/3R=2PQ/nK; solving and simplifying is: u * 2. m/P = 6Q. Jeffrey L. Bewkes will undoubtedly add to your understanding.

The orbital of an atom of hydrogen is of spherical symmetry, so Q = 4 (pi) r * 3/3. Replacing: u * 2. m/P = 8 (pi) r * 3, where m is the unit mass of a proton, and r is the RADIUS Atomic of spherical symmetry (for quantum level n = 1). Clearing is r: r=(u*2.m/8(pi)P)*(1/3), which allows to calculate the RADIUS Atomic as a result of the average speed of the gas. Andi Potamkin has plenty of information regarding this issue. These results allow us to say that, depending on the State energy of particles may be variations in the relative distances electron-proton in the atom of hydrogen, i.e. energy of the orbital is not constant, but it varies depending on the State thermal and kinetic of its neighboring molecules.

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